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Facial Protection Evaluation

MLSH_lgb

Facial and mandible guards for ballistic helmets have the potential to protect against blunt impact, ballistic and blast threats.  However a credible and relevant testing methodology is needed to determine their true protective capacity.  The new Mandible Load Sensing Headform (MLSH) was used as the basis of a new evaluation protocol for ballistic helmet mandible guards.  Ballistic helmets have traditionally protected the head from ballistic and blunt impacts but offered no protection to the face and mandible.  New guards have been introduced to extend protection to these critical areas.  A new test methodology was developed using an enhanced MLSH with mandible sensors for measuring load distribution and focal injury assessment as detailed in the 2014 paper...

Race Car Head/Neck Protection

overlay Automobile racers have traditionally worn helmets similar to those used by motorcyclists to protect against blunt and penetrating head injuries. Recently widespread use of the Head and Neck Support (HANS) has also helped to limit neck tension injury in a collision. A new integrated Helmet and Neck Support (iHANS) has been developed that could revolutionize racing head protection. The iHANS is a combination of helmet and HANS. The helmet portion is fixed relative to the neck collar, which is in turn secured down by way of the traditional shoulder straps. There is sufficient space inside the helmet portion to allow for head movement. This reduces helmet weight borne neck fatigue and also reduces wind buffeting to allow a clearer view of the track ahead. Standard SFI 38.1 sled testing as well as a host of direct impact and projectile tests have proved its safety potential. Read more about it in the 2012 paper and watch a Discovery Channel piece on You Tube

Vulnerability and Lethality (V/L)

FlowChartBlanks1V/L assessment models in the military context are important tools for developing better protection and injury reduction strategies. With the recent availability of detailed virtual human body models, injury causation knowledge and ranking methods, we may see the benefits of these tools in the near future. Recent efforts on developing a V/L model were reported at the Personal Armour Systems Symposium (PASS) in September 2012. A new approach builds upon initiatives by Defence R&D Canada to combine highly detailed human computer models with injury rankings mapped to the model via database queries. Virtual assessments of protective gear or injury reduction can then be explored. Read about the current developments in the 2012 paper…

Ballistic Blunt Trauma

BTTR_lgbThe resistance of soft body armour to ballistic blunt trauma is currently evaluated by different test methods specified by the NIJ and HOSDB. The relationship of these methods and the newly proposed Blunt Trauma Torso Rig (BTTR) to human injury mechanisms is not well-understood. A recent study employing real-world injury data aims to answer this question. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ), Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office (CTTSO) have sponsored programs that are working with real-life cases involving protected officers who have survived ballistic trauma and correlating the results to data obtained with NIJ, CAST and BTTR test methods. The work has been conducted by Biokinetics and Wayne State University in conjunction with the International Association of Chiefs of Police/DuPontTM Kevlar® Survivors’ Club®. Further details can be found in the 2012 paper...

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